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Rajasthan Heritage Week

This collection was a result of the collaboration with the Rajasthan government and Prasad bidappa associates.Only local Rajasathani fabric was sourced and used for this collection. An assortment of embroidered and plain kota doria, Ajarakh, leheriya and ikat was used in making this collection. The idea behind this collection was to showcase traditional Rajasthani textiles as a part of contemporary fashion.

This collection was showcased at Rajasthan Heritage Week 2016, in December 2016.

The Maze

The Maze

The maze is a journey, that closely mimics the world we live in- feeling lost and making chance discoveries. The maze is a reflection of the current times- the constant loop of feeling unsettled and emerging with a glimmer of hope.

The maze explores the symbiotic relationship between fashion, textiles, performance art and installation design to create a unique interactive experience. The audience equipped with personal headphones, take the journey into an immersive world. Walking at their own pace, getting lost in the maze and eventually making their way our- mimicking the warps and wefts of the threads. The clothes - sculpted and structured, play with our signature meta wire and leather cord weaving techniques. Each hair thin metallic wire is individually sewn to create a metallic surface. Leather is broken down into cords and then hand woven back together.

The maze was developed by Rimzim Dadu and Rajat Sodhi (Architect and found of Or Project). It is part of a series of collaborative projects that explore the intersection between art of textile making and architecture.

Artisans on the ramp at India Fashion Week

Our firm belief in making art and the process of creation more accessible to the public has led to us to collaborate with museums, art galleries and artisans.

Artisans on the ramp at India Fashion Week

In March 2016, we transported our studio to the ramp to showcase not just clothes, but the process and the people who create them. We wanted people to interact with the artisans who make our clothes. We wanted to take the focus away from just the final product and put the spotlight on the process. Our clothes and techniques are very labour intensive and need fine craftsmanship. Our idea was to let the audiences witness the process and interact with the artisans. And our colleagues were more than happy to be on the ramp!

"I come from a small town and never knew that people appreciated my profession. I still can't believe what has happened, I saw models walking wearing the clothes I had made," embroider Jamal Siddiqui said.

This show was very well received by the critics and the media.

Photograph courtesy : Dwaipayan Mazumdar

Silicone Jamdani at Fracture, Devi Art Foundation

Silicone Jamdani at Fracture, Devi Art Foundation

In early 2015, we collaborated with the Devi Art Foundation to give a radical but an experimental take on the sari.We took nearly two years to create a silicone Jamdani sari as part of an initiative to "reinvent" Indian textiles.

Silicone sheets were shredded into fine cords to form the warp and weft of the Jamdani Sari.

 

The entire sari has been hand woven, and is an outcome of 2 years worth of work and planning.

 

The sari received great reviews from the media. "Her work seeks to redefine Indian craft for global and domestic audiences," wrote the BBC.

 

Fabric of India Exhibition at the V&A Museum, London

Fabric of India Exhibition at the V&A Museum, London

Earlier in 2016, we reinterpreted the traditional Patola weave from the state of Gujarat using leather cords. This collection was showcased at the Fabric of India Exhibition at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.